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Baby's First Food - When, What, How to introduce Solid foods.

Updated: Jun 5, 2021


Introducing solid foods is one of the most exciting milestones of your baby's first year. Think of all the tastes and textures that await your little one — There's a whole world of flavors to discover and explore, and starting solids is the first step.

Encourage your baby to enjoy herself while trying new foods, even if a good portion of them ends up on her bib, the tray or the floor. It's all part of the great experiment of taking those taste buds to the next level.



When do babies start eating solid foods?


Most babies are ready to start solids between 5 and 6 months (and experts recommend waiting until closer to 6 months in many cases), but your little one's individual development definitely tops the list when deciding whether or not it's time to graduate to a more varied diet.

Though you might be eager to to start foods there are plenty of reasons why starting a baby on solids too soon isn't smart.

First, a very young baby's digestive system — from a tongue that pushes out any foreign substance placed on it, to intestines still lacking many digestive enzymes — is unready developmentally for solids. Plus, solids aren't necessary early on — babies can fill all their nutritional needs for the first six months of life from breast milk or formula alone.

Bringing on the solids too soon can also undermine future eating habits. And especially in formula-fed babies, early introduction of solids can lead to obesity later on in childhood and beyond.

On the other hand, waiting too long — say, until 9 months or later — can also lead to potential pitfalls. An older baby may resist being taught the new (and challenging) tricks of chewing and swallowing solids, preferring to cling to the tried-and-true (and easy) methods of breastfeeding or bottle-feeding.

Some parents also choose to adopt an approach called On the other hand, waiting too long — say, until 9 months or later — can also lead to potential pitfalls. An older baby may resist being taught the new tricks of chewing and swallowing solids, preferring to cling to the tried-and-true methods of breastfeeding or bottle-feeding. And, like habits, tastes can be harder to change at this point. Unlike the more pliable younger baby, an older baby may not be as open to solids when milky liquids have long monopolized the menu.


Some parents also choose to adopt an approach called baby-led weaning, where the baby eats on her own, starting by simple puree and eating vegetables in long- cut form. Boiled vegetables. Using a high chair.



What are signs my baby is ready for solid food?

  • Your baby can hold her head up well when propped to sit. Even strained baby foods should not be offered until then. Chunkier foods should wait until a baby can sit well alone, usually not until 7 months.

  • Your baby reaches for and otherwise shows an interest in table foods. If she's grabbing the fork out of your hand or watching intently and excitedly with every bite you take, that may be a sign that she's hungry for more grown-up fare.

  • Your little one is able to open wide. That way, food can be taken from a spoon.

How to introduce solid foods to baby

One of the first and best steps in raising a good eater is to model healthy enjoyment of food yourself. Babies who see adults eating good food and enjoying it are more likely to be interested in following their example.

Always start slowly no need to rush, BEFORE starting meal breastfeed or formula feed half and hour before so that they can be full even if they reject their first meal.

have patient while feeding for babies, allow them to explore their taste buds, start with 1 or 2 spoons of food on the first day, no worries even they throw up.

Follow THREE DAY rule, Serve the same food for continues 3 days, and watch out for any food allergies, stomach upset and changes in potty.


What are the best first foods for a baby?

No matter what's on the menu, if you're introducing solids in the form of purees (as opposed to trying baby-led weaning), the texture of your baby's first foods should be super smooth and practically dripping off the spoon. If you prepare your own baby food, you should strain, puree or finely mash it, and then thin it with liquid if necessary.

As your baby becomes a more experienced eater you can stop giving them in full purees and start giving them in semi- purees.

Here are good first foods to start with for spoon-feeding:

  • Cereal. If you start with baby cereal, pick a single-grain, iron-enriched, whole-grain variety, like brown rice, whole-grain oat or whole-grain barley. To prepare, mix a small amount of baby cereal with formula, breast milk or even water to create a creamy "soup." Don't sweeten the taste by adding things like mashed bananas, applesauce or juice — first, because it's best to introduce only one food at a time, and second, because it's better for baby to acquire a taste for plain before you sweeten the cereal pot.

  • Vegetables. Start with simple, carrot, beetroot, peas and potato. If your baby rejects what you give her, try again tomorrow and the next day and the next. Some babies need to be introduced to a new food 10 to 15 times before they'll accept it, so perseverance is key.

  • Fruit. Banana, avocado, apples in puree form.


At 8 months, you can start What are the best first foods for a baby?

No matter what's on the menu, if you're introducing solids in the form of purees (as opposed to trying baby-led weaning), the texture of your baby's first foods should be super smooth and practically dripping off the spoon. If you prepare your own baby food, you should strain, puree or finely mash it, and then thin it with liquid if necessary.


As your baby becomes a more experienced eater (usually around 7 months or older), gradually reduce the liquid you add and thicken the texture.


At 8 months, you can start trying finger foods to add a whole other dimension to eating.


Always hold off on honey (which can contain spores of Clostridium botulinum, a bacteria that is harmless to adults but can cause infantile botulism, a serious illness, in babies) and cow's milk until your baby is at least 1 year old. Most doctors will, however, green-light whole-milk yogurt, cheese, butter by 8 months or so, or even sooner.


How do I prevent choking when introducing solids?

Here's what to do to prevent choking when solid food is on the menu:

  • Stay close. At this point, eating should be with you closely watching every bite your baby takes.

  • Start small. Cut food into pieces tiny enough that your baby can swallow them whole if she doesn't spend any time gumming them.

  • Get bigger slowly. As your baby gets used to eating pieces of soft, solid food, gradually move up — from minced to chopped to small cubes.

  • Keep the portions baby-sized. Place only one or two chunks at a time on the plate or tray so she doesn't stuff in more than she can handle.

  • Stay seated. Not you, but baby. Offer finger foods to your baby only when she's sitting down — not crawling, cruising or toddling around.

You also shouldn't give your baby foods that won't dissolve in the mouth, can't be mashed with the gums or can be easily sucked into the windpipe.

Avoid:

  • Uncooked raisins

  • Whole peas (unless they are smashed)

  • Large chunks of meat or poultry

  • Popcorn

  • Nuts

Gagging vs. choking: How can I tell the difference?

Alarming as it might seem, if your baby gags during her first encounter with any kind of food, her reaction is normal. When a baby gags, it's a sign that she has either taken in too much food or pushed it too far back in her mouth. In either case, the gag reflex is what helps her get that food all the way out of harm's way.

Make sure your baby is sitting upright in her chair, offer manageable servings and be sure to learn the difference between gagging and choking:

  • A child who is choking will look terrified, will not be making any sounds and will be unable to breathe

  • A baby who is experiencing a gag reflex will be coughing and making sounds.

If all this sounds complicated, take heart: In some ways, feeding a baby is easier than satisfying sophisticated older palates. Baby's first solid foods can be served cold, slightly warmed or at room temperature. And don't worry about adding salt, sugar or other spices — even the mildest pureed squash is an adventurous new taste and sensation for a little one just starting out.


Happy parenting!!



source bit : experience from my elder child and Wikipedia 

CHECK OUT MY OTHER YOUTUBE VLOG SERIES IN BLOG FORM, LINKS ARE GIVEN BELOW:

Rocket Stove - What is it all about


Other way to traditional way series blog and youtube link given below:


Chicken Gravy & Rajamudi rice (EP1 Rocket Stove)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NbnO0tszqQs&t=19s


Green Chili Prawns & Black rice (Kavuni rice) (EP2 Rocket Stove)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXUqPpE7SWM&t=220s


Paneer Pot Briyani & Sesame Brinjal Fry- veg (Rocket Stove EP3)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HaJJ1qBJJlg


Egg Drop Gravy with Chapathi || Rocket Stove EP4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URYSsxXt5C4


Silver Pomfret Fry ||Rocket Stove EP5

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bmsAlLnBvF4&t=21s


Other 6th month baby food recipes link given below:

Baby's First Food - When, What, How to introduce Solid foods.

Ragi Powder (Home-made) - for Babies

Sprouted Ragi Powder for babies

Homemade Rice-Moong Dal Cerelac

Sathumaavu - Health Mix Power

Rice Moong- Dal Cerelac

Ragi Porridge

Sprouted Ragi Porridge

Carrot Puree






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